Burna Boy Sparks National Debate With African Giant Album

Burna Boy

Burna Boy dropped his much-anticipated album African Giant yesterday to rave reviews as fans and critics alike praised the album for its creativity.

But one of the songs, in particular, Another Story, really captured the imagination of many Nigerians.

The song told the history of Nigeria and according to Burna Boy, the country was no more than a business deal to the British who bought the entire nation off the Royal Niger Company also known today as Unilever.

He said on the song,

To understand Nigeria, you need to appreciate where it came from. In 1900 Britain assumed responsibility for the administration of the whole of what we now know as Nigeria from the Niger company and then gradually over the years, British protectorates were established throughout the territory.  In 1914, the protectorates were amalgamated into one Nigeria.

Actually, there’s one additional detail that bears mentioning.
In order to take over the territories from the Niger Company, the British Government paid 865,000 pounds. A huge amount in 1900

So let’s establish a simple truth, the British didn’t travel halfway across the world just to spread democracy. Nigeria started off as a business deal for them, between a company and a government. Incidentally, the Niger Company is still around today. Only it is known by a different name, Unilever

But that’s another story

The song caused an eruption of views on Twitter with many Nigerians going to check their facts to see if indeed what is being said on the song is true.

It might seem that way as one follower tweeted: “Burna Boy really a Legend for dropping this Tea on the track “Another Story” in the #AfricanGiant

“Found out that Niger Company AKA Unilever poisoned Jaja Of Opobo, made King Koko commit suicide while on exile after killing the Nembe people

“Ran the then oba of Benin out of town”

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